Intimate Partner Sexual Violence: Translating Research into Recommended Intervention Practices (Session S)

15 Nov 2019
10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Intimate Partner Sexual Violence: Translating Research into Recommended Intervention Practices (Session S)

Sexual violence in intimate partnerships is a serious and prevalent form of violence against women. Among reported instances of sexual assault in Canada, over a third were committed by an intimate partner (Rotenberg, 2017). Another recent Canadian report indicated that 34% of female victims of spousal assault experienced being sexually assaulted, beaten, choked or threatened with a gun or a knife by their partners (Statistics Canada, 2016). More general statistics from the U.S. indicate that at least 7% of all women surveyed have been raped by an intimate partner (Finkelhor & Yllo, 1985; Tjaden & Thoennes, 1998). Not surprising, but sexual violence within an intimate partner relationship has received less attention than physical violence in relationships or sexual violence, in general. This session will address this oft-neglected area of intimate partner sexual violence.

The existing literature has used various terms to describe sexual violence within an intimate partner relationship, which includes but is not limited to marital rape, date rape, forced sex in marriage, and partner sexual violence. Hence, a concise overview of the literature, specifically focused on defining what comprises intimate partner sexual violence, will be given. This will be followed by an examination of the perpetrators and the victims of intimate partner sexual violence using local data to provide an overview of features that characterize perpetrators in relation to those who commit non-sexual intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence. Finally, the risk and criminogenic needs of these perpetrators will be explored. It is critical for professionals to be able to identify areas of relevance that are specific to the perpetration of intimate partner sexual violence in order to effectively evaluate, supervise, and treat perpetrators.